Critical Leadership Traits

What can I say about Leadership Traits? I've worked for leaders, been a leader and coached leaders for over 40 years. In that time, I've recognized certain leadership traits are common to the majority of great leaders. That's my subjective observation. In my coaching practice, I use personality assessment tools to help me, coach, understand my clients, and to help them understand themselves and their teams. I compiled a list of all company leaders/ CEOs with whom I've administered a personality assessment in order to objectively determine which leadership traits are most common. The leaders in this survey all run companies ranging from $1 million in revenue to $40 million. Most Personality Assesment tools measure Dominance, Extraversion, Patience, and Formality. Good tools, like Predictive Index, and Ngenio's MPO realize that these traits fall on a spectrum. For instance, in the case of formality, which measures things like precision, attention to detail and rules following. Some people are extremely rigid and precise while others are extremely flexible, and others still may just be slightly precise. For instance, in the case of the Predictive Index the spectrum looks like this: Low -3 -2 -1 Trait +1 +2 +3 High Agreeable Agreeable Humble Unselfish A Independent Resolute Forceful Assertive Amenable Accepting Peaceable Dominance Competitive Autonomous Aggressive Acquiescent Collaborative Caring Self—starting Venturesome Controlling Compliant Pleasing Attentive Resourceful Innovative Self-reliant Accommodating Modest Supportive Inventive Directing Confrontational Obliging Willing Cooperative Determined Challenging Unyielding Reserved Private Imaginative Quiet B Sociable Simulating Expressive Outgoing Standoffish Reserved Sincere Extraversion Persuasive Enthusiastic Gregarious Separate Unpretentious Introspective Talkative Socially poised Enticing Reticent Ruminant Contemplative Open Compelling Outspoken Isolated Insightful Candid Encouraging Eloquent Influential Reclusive Pensive Reflective Eager Animated Convincing Impatient Zealous High-strung Tense C Relaxed Deliberate Extremely steady Steady Volatile Hurried Quick Patience Stable Measured Placid Edgy Intense Hasty Calm Unhurried Habitual Impulsive Fast-paced Prompt Cool Peaceful Easygoing Urgent Abrupt Ready Composed Serene Even-tempered Rushed Rapid Restless Collected Unruffled Mellow Flexibility Spontaneous Familiar Casual D Conservative Precise Dutiful Conforming Unstructured Unworried Uninhibited Formality Thorough Careful Inflexible Extemporaneous Undaunted Easy Respectful Cautious Structured Instinctive Unconcerned Facile Loyal Exacting Strict Impulsive Carefree Flexible Diligent Proper Vigilant Improvising Unfussy Pliable Serious Rigorous Correct What patterns emerge from evaluating my database. Most of the leaders I work with are...

Leadership Versus Management

I had the good fortune to sit down with Jonathon Abermen, Managing Director of Amplifier Ventures, to discuss leadership versus management. Below is the audio of the interview which was broadcast April 27, 2018, on WFED, Fed Radio 1500. Press the little play button to hear the interview: [sc_embed_player fileurl="https://drivenforward.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/WFED_Leadership_versus_management.mp3"] Transcript of Leadership Versus Management Interview ABERMAN: Glen, thanks for joining us. HELLMAN: Thank you for having me. ABERMAN: Leadership. I think a lot of people think they know what it is, but what is leadership? HELLMAN: So, probably the best way to sum it up is the difference between leadership and management. Management is how you take care of two-year-old children or less. You put up gates, you give them systems, you protect them, but you don’t do anything that’s not under your control. Leadership is, if you haven’t taken your 17-year-old and led them, when they’re out in the car alone, on a Friday night, at ten o’clock, you have failed. You can’t manage 17-year-old when they’re not in your view. Leadership is creating an environment around your team where they behave the way you would want them to if you were there. Leadership scales, management fails. Subscribe to the What’s Working in Washington podcast on...

Foundational Strengths Creating Happy Employees

Foundational Strengths That Create a Consistent and Happy Employees By Michael Matalone The 3 Foundational Strengths Knowledge: Specific to the jobs requirements Skills: Application of the above specific knowledge that creates consistent results Traits: An alignment of the individual’s hardwired personality traits and the required behaviors of the role Knowledge: While these three strengths may appear to be simplistic, many people misunderstand them when hiring and/or making promotions. For example, with regards to the first strength Knowledge. Many people assume that if a person has a college degree or especially an advanced degree, this sets them apart from those that do not and therefore they have a greater ability to succeed in the role. This is simply not true. We have all read about or even have known or worked with people who defy this belief. Maybe your one of them. For example, let’s say you graduated from a top university with a degree in Finance, then you get your MBA and CPA. Based on their educational accomplishments, you hire them to be the Director of Operations for your company. Did their education prepare them with the required knowledge to be a successful Director of Operations? Well, it may have provided “some” of the required knowledge, but not a majority...

Real Entrepreneurial Bible Verse

A friend of mine, who apparently frequents only the best bathrooms found this entrepreneurial bible verse written on the walls of a bathroom, somewhere in America. It should be the bible of startup entrepreneurs everywhere. It says, stop worrying about getting a pat on the back. Stop spending time on Glitter Traction. Get some shit done! Kudos to the unknown author of this Entrepreneurial Bible Verse: Set some goals. Be quiet about them. Smash the shit out of them. Clap for your own damn self. Author Unknown,  photo by Scott Stephen's in a bathroom somewhere in America. This rant reminded me of another entrepreneurial rant posted by Stephen Candelmo a few years ago. Are you focused on meeting real tangible goals that make a positive difference in your business? As an executive coach, I work with people who run businesses and help them make decisions, set goals and then get them to meet those goals. Want to know what that feels like? Try a no-obligation, complimentary, online coaching session. Schedule your executive business coaching session now by pressing the little red button and we'll get you on the road to entrepreneurial success....

Emotional Intelligence and Leadership

According to Harvard Business Review, Emotional Intelligence or EQ is an essential ingredient for success as a leader. In a study of one company, leaders with high Emotional Intelligence outperformed the average manager by 20% while low EQ leaders performed nearly 20% lower than average. What are the elements of Emotional Intelligence? There are five major factors: Self-awareness - defined as an awareness of who you are and your effect on others. People who believe they have no room for improvement are not self-aware. People who recognize, admit and work to overcome their shortcomings make better leaders. Self-aware people are: Realistic about their self-assessment Display a self-deprecating sense of humor Are confident Self-regulation - defined as controlling one's impulses and thinking before acting. Leaders with strong self-regulation tendencies create an atmosphere of trust resulting in higher productivity. They display: Thoughtfulness Comfort with ambiguity Integrity Motivation - motivated people are driven to perform beyond expectations. Their drive to exceed goals is contagious. They are motivated by greater things than just money. Motivation is displayed by: Passion for the work Desire to continuously improve - Daniel Pink Calls this Mastery Optimistism - everything is an opportunity Empathy - is essential to coaching, motivating individuals and creating cohesive...

Business Focus – The Video

Business Focus A couple of weeks ago, I sat down over a beer and over an internet connection and about 800 miles of distance with Max Traylor of Beers with Max. We talked about lessons of a Turn-Around executive and why companies fail. Here's an excerpt from the interview on Business Focus. If you're getting this via RSS-Feed or Email, link here for the video. Max:  What would you say was the was the biggest challenge if you did notice any trends in these failing startup companies? What would you say is the biggest challenge and don't let the audience being sales and marketing professionals taint your answer. Mr. Cranky: Business Focus...

The Acquired Taste

I'm an acquired taste. Many people try me once and gag. Some come back again, give it another try and eventually, I become a habit. Huh? Mr. Cranky...