Competitive Strategy: Value Discipline

Imagine you were building a football team from the ground up. Would you just go about willy-nilly picking the best available players?  Do you think after you filled your roster and realized you had 10 quarterbacks, and no running backs or receivers you’d ever win a game? What is your value discipline? No, when you build a team, you build a team around the best talent available to execute a particular style of play.  You choose a style of play, build a team around that style. You build a strategy around the optimal path to exploit your resources and compete against the other teams. If there are no great throwing quarterbacks available and there are a ton of mobile quarterbacks and running backs, you build a running team. To build on that you would look for linemen that can help you support that running strategy. You declare to the team, "we are a ball control team." You better make sure everyone on the offense now understands we are a run oriented-offense. The coach declares to win we keep the ball on the ground, control the clock, and dominate the ground game. Everyone knows we are built to run. If the coach misses...

The Power of Culture

Strong Culture Rarely Exists In The Wild [caption id="attachment_78719" align="alignright" width="189"] Ghost Orchid[/caption] The ghost orchid is one of the worlds rarest flowers. Since its first sighting in 1954, it has been found in the wild less than two dozen times. Yet it can be cultivated and grown in greenhouses in large quantities. Like the ghost orchid, a powerful culture of high-performance is rarely found organically grown in the wild. The best leaders build a powerful culture by bringing together the proper conditions for their teams to thrive. Potential leaders who randomly gather groups of individuals in the hope that someday, like a rare, naturally growing ghost orchid, they will find themselves the leaders of high-performance teams are likely to be disappointed. Yet if they intentionally built a cultural greenhouse, planted the right seeds, applied the exact amounts of moisture, carbon dioxide, nitrogen and sunlight to ensure a strong culture thrives, they would have a significantly greater probability of success. To lead a great team with a strong culture it is best to be a great leader and to be a great leader, one must be like horticulturists who presides over a successful greenhouse. Great leaders must be scientific, deliberate...

The Importance of Intentional Leadership

Great leaders are empathetic. They intuitively model the behaviors of leadership that attract and retain loyal, highly-motivated followers. When it comes to leadership, few of us naturally have it, most of us must be more disciplined in our approach. Sure we can read leadership books. We can bury ourselves under piles of books by Tom Peters, Sheryl Sandberg, Ken Blanchard, Seth Godin, Daniel Pink, Simon Sinek, Doctor Suess (Really! Oh the Places You'll Go) and many more (just please don't read any Tony Robbins). All these books speak to our human minds. They are replete with logical frameworks, high falutin language, and abstracts concepts. The problem with that is humans, as in the majority of you who are reading this are not logical. Neuroscience research tells us that the part of the human brain that decides to play follow the leader or to step out of line has no capacity for language, abstract thought or logic. It is hard-wired to avoid risk at the expense of gain. This part of the brain that is the ultimate deciderer in the brain is the same part of the brain we share with alligators...

Bio Glen Hellman – Coaching Through Chaos

Gordon Bernhardt is a local Wealth Manager and a genuinely good human being. I first met him about a decade ago when we were both members of the same Vistage Group. Last month I sat down with Gordon for an Interview to create a Glen Hellman bio for Gordon's Profiles in Courage Series of Articles. There are many clues to who is Glen Hellman all over this web, you can check out a brief Glen Hellman bio on the About Me Page Here. There's the Beth Berman interview about my Why. There's the Glen Hellman Predictive Index article. There are all the great tweets about me from my buddy Peter Corbett. But none of these reveal what took place in the 4 hour sit down interview with Gordon. I have to admit, that Mr. Cranky got a little teary-eyed during the discussion...

Leaf Branch Root Coaching

Leaf Branch Root, it's a method to coach, empower, and learn to trust your team. Lately, in my coaching, I encounter the micromanager who say they don't want to micromanage and inevitably this is a trust issue. It's part hero issue, I must save the day...

Hank O’Donnell on Hero Syndrome

Hank O'Donnell is a Philadelphia-based Business Coach. I met Hank O'Donnell several years ago when I attended a Vistage Coach Training Seminar in Leesburg Virginia and Hank led several of the sessions. I was a relatively new Vistage Coach at that time and O'Donnell as a veteran coach was working with a group of coaches to help us hone our craft. This was back when Vistage still invested heavily in Coach Training (see Why I Quit Vistage). Since then I've moved on as has Hank O'Donnell but I still learn from him via his emails and video blogs. Here's a great example of one of his videos. Watch and learn as Hank drops leadership knowledge. Quoting from Hank: I've discovered a major flaw in many leaders — myself included. I call it The Hero Complex, and it creates what Dr. Stephen Karpman calls The Drama Triangle. I love to rescue people! It made me feel good to solve my team’s problems, but after a while, it became exhausting. I’d become the “victim” myself, and they became the “persecutors.” I’d find myself saying, “Why don't they take responsibility and first try to tackle problems on their own? Why do they always come to me?” What I didn’t...

How Can You Get Better Company Results Next Year?

Want better company results? There is no lonelier person than a leader. I’ve been there. I understand the isolation of leadership. In my 30+ years of business, my leadership teams, boards of directors, and family were all available all the time, and yet I was often isolated. I required advisors whom I could trust, who had no agenda, and who would ask me tough questions. I needed to deliver better company results. As an executive coach, I strive to be that safe, nonjudgmental, confidential, critical thinking partner. I strive to be the cure for the loneliness at the top. I believe in: Asking questions Questioning answers Critical thinking Finding truth Authenticity Integrity Making a difference Caring What Does That Mean to You? Studies show that isolation can lead to missteps, but when business leaders have a safe place to discuss issues, a nonjudgmental strategy partner, and the aid of a quality executive coach, they make better decisions and achieve better results. How do you find out if this will work for you? Find a coach who: Has experience leading companies Has been trained and certified by a reputable coaching organization Follows a disciplined coaching methodology Allows you to try a coaching session because every great...

Driven Forward Business Coaching Methodology

When hiring an executive or business coach a potential client should inquire is there a business coaching methodology? Is there a process that the executive coach follows? About My Business Coaching Methodology Driven Forward Coaching Methodology is adapted from training and certifications Glen Hellman obtained a decade of business coaching. Many people confuse coaching with consulting. Effective coaching, however, differs from consulting in that a quality coach asks questions and avoids proposing solutions. A good coach guides a client to develop an optimum, prioritized action plan through spirited questioning to enable the client to develop a plan that they will commit to execute. Research shows that people have a higher probability of executing plans they develop as opposed to plans that are developed for them. As a coach, it is my responsibility to vigorously question your thinking in order to help the client crystallize the best path forward. Coaches are like gloves...

Harvard Business Review – HBR Business Coach Study

Just completed, an HBR Business Coach Study which is the result of a survey of 140 leading coaches. The data was then reviewed by respondents and "five experts." The Headlines of the HBR Business Coach Study The Bar Must Be Raised - Coaches shouldn't be able to just hang up a shingle and call themselves a coach. Experience and Training Count Fixing Toxic Corporate Culture Major Driving Force - Over the last decade coaches were engaged to fix the toxic behavior of corporate leaders Development of Top Performers - Companies are realizing that offering coaches to top performers is a wise investment Blurred Lines - Coaches and clients should be aware of the difference between a business coach and a therapist Gaining Legitimacy - Coaching is more and more being acknowledged as providing value Buyer Beware - Check out references, experience, training before hiring a coach HBR Business Coach by the numbers   HBR Business Coach Buying Guidelines Other HBR Business Coach Study Findings Ingredients of a successful coaching relationship Is the executive highly motivated to change - the best coaching recipients are gree and growing, lifelong learners Good chemistry between coach and client is essential The C-suite needs must be committed to retain and develop coached executives Shifting focus...