Startup Business Plan

Corporate Governance Requirements For Angel Investors

Angel Investing is inherently risky. Startups, in general, aren't for the weak at heart. It is even more perilous when investing with minimal leverage that comes with a small investment of $25 - $50 thousand. Over a 10 year period, I made 7 investments that returned 180 percent. Over the same period of time, the S&P returned 250 percent. Yes, I took 50 times the risk to get a fraction of the return. How could I have improved the returns? I should have insisted that companies followed certain corporate governance norms. And if I didn't have the leverage to dictate good governance, I should have invested alongside someone who had the power to mandate good corporate governance terms. Let's look at my investments to illustrate what I mean? Winners With Responsible Leadership Social Tables - Great Management Team, Frequent Credible Business Status, and Financial Reporting and Regular Board Supervision Veenome - Great Founder, Frequent Credible Business Status and regular investor conference calls seeking input. Sideways With Responsible Leadership TalkLocal - Great Management Team, Frequent Credible Business Status, and Financial Reporting and regular investor conference calls seeking input. Winners With Leadership Issues none Losers With Leadership Issues SpotFlux - Not sure, I invested...

Bullshit – Jason Calacanis Angel University

It's difficult to make money in Angel Investing. Most Angels lose money. For people who want to spend money to learn how to lose money, there is Jason Calacanis Angel University. Because if you're willing to flush cash down a toilet, why not flush some of that cash down the Jason Calacanis Angel University toilet. Wait just one cotton-picking minute Glenbo, you Cranky old fart...

Angel Investing Is Broken Part 1

Angel Investing is Broken and there are multiple factors that cooked the Goose that was never really golden. To evaluate the change, let's look back in history. In the 1990s there was a much higher bar to start a company. Every bozo with an idea did not get to call themselves a founder. To start a company, real capital was required. There was no cloud, so software founders were forced to use real cash, $100's of thousands of dollars on expensive computer equipment. There was no open source so software had to be developed from scratch costing more time, man-hours and mullah. The infrastructure didn't exist to facilitate a geographically dispersed team which meant that products were developed with expensive in-house, on-shore resources. The result? In the 90s if you couldn't raise $6 million from a Venture Capital firm, you were a dreamer and not a founder. This meant that few companies with similar ideas got off the ground, the competition was limited and a Venture Capital blessing significantly increased the odds of a win. In the 1990s, raising six million dollars was a serious barrier to entry to enter a market. Just the fact of raising enough money to build a product made the...

Startup Business Plan

Get Investors to Read Your Startup Business Plan

How do you get investors to read your startup business plan? Well short of walking into their offices and holding a gun on them, there's no guaranteed way to get them to read a business plan. There are however several ways to get them to not read your startup business plan and they include: Send it to investors who don't invest in your space - You're a pre-revenue media entertainment startup located in Washington DC seeking seed funding and you send the plan to a later-stage investor that doesn't focus in media and entertainment. Wrong Stage. Wrong Geography. Wrong Investor. Blind Unsolicited - Send in an unsolicited blind plan. Why waste a stamp. If you're sending in a blind, unsolicited business plan to an investor, save yourself a stamp. Just put it in an envelope, address the envelope and place it in your recycle bin. Maybe you should shred it first so no one else will find out how stupid you are. Technology - Make it all about the tech. Tell them every thing about the inner workings of your technology and ignore why anyone would want it. Use lots and lots of big words - Forget graphics, bullets and a narrative....