Bio Glen Hellman – Coaching Through Chaos

Gordon Bernhardt is a local Wealth Manager and a genuinely good human being. I first met him about a decade ago when we were both members of the same Vistage Group. Last month I sat down with Gordon for an Interview to create a Glen Hellman bio for Gordon’s Profiles in Courage Series of Articles. There are many clues to who is Glen Hellman all over this web, you can check out a brief Glen Hellman bio on the About Me Page Here. There’s the Beth Berman interview about my Why. There’s the Glen Hellman Predictive Index article. There are all the great tweets about me from my buddy Peter Corbett. But none of these reveal what took place in the 4 hour sit down interview with Gordon.

I have to admit, that Mr. Cranky got a little teary-eyed during the discussion… Gordon found a soft spot or two. Here’s the story he teased out of me.


COACHING THROUGH CHAOS

When Glen Hellman’s three-year-old son looked up at him and declared he wanted to be a hockey player, Glen was surprised. Glen had never been to a game before in his life, let alone played the sport himself, and had decided to bring the boy on a whim. But when his son’s mind was set on hockey, then so was his.

At the time, Glen lived in Maryland but commuted to work in Denver, where he was the CEO of a struggling company. Still, he knew his son’s dream was worth making time for. “When everyone else was getting ready to go skiing for the weekend, I’d take the evening flight back east and get home around 1:00 AM,” he remembers today. “A couple hours later, I’d wake up to take him to the skating rink. But since I’d never played hockey myself, I couldn’t actively participate the way I wanted to. So, at 42, I learned how to play, taking lessons and joining a beginners men’s team. I became a coach, and I coached my son’s team.”

Through the many practices and games, Glen soon saw that the joy he got from coaching was about more than helping his own son, who grew up to lead his high school team to the Maryland state finals as captain. It came from an innate, fundamental affinity for the work of guiding others to success, and he grew deeply invested in the well-being and growth of each child on the team. One day, he ran into the mother of a kid he had spent extra time with because his father wasn’t around much. “I never got the chance to thank you,” she said. “In school, my son was asked to write a paper about the most important person in his life, and he wrote about you.” “That moment stands out in my memory as one of my proudest,” Glen says. “Right alongside the time I saw my son pause in front of a wide open goal. Instead of making the goal himself, he passed the puck to a teammate who had never scored a goal in his life.”

For almost thirty years of his professional career, Glen was involved in the lifecycle of companies. It wasn’t until 2007 that he realized the passion he had for coaching his son’s hockey team was more than a pastime. In fact, it was a calling. Now the owner and CEO of Driven Forward, a flexible coaching program for busy executives, Glen applies his decades of experience to helping small business leaders overcome the challenges of isolated leadership and expand the success of their life’s work.

(See the rest of the article on Gordon Bernhardt’s Profiles in Success Web Site)